Bhaio Aur Baheno

Bhaio aur Baheno,” boomed the voice of the local MLA, addressing a mass meeting, seeking vote. “I am here today not only to seek your vote but also to solving your ever growing water crisis. This is my first priority today.” But before he could take a sip of water, similar voice emerged from the loud speakers emulating his speech- Bhaio aur Baheno, I am here today not only to seek your vote but also to solving your ever growing water crisis. This is my first priority today.”

Before the bewildered party leader could exclaim his confusion at the repetition of his political speech, an opposition leader explained the situation. “It is just a replay of your address delivered by you during your last visit to this constituency three years ago!

This, unfortunately is the picture everywhere in India where promises are made to resolve the water scarcity, but are seldom kept due to a wide variety of reasons, while the country is facing its worst-ever water crisis, with around 600 million people facing acute water shortage – a government of India think-tank says.

While the Niti Ayog Report, which draws on data from 24 of India’s 29 states, says the crisis is ‘only going to get worse’ in the years ahead, EarthyyBags, a staunch ally of the mother earth explores the situation and provide the information as given below.  

Along with the strain on surface water, the country is also facing great stress with freshwater. Lack of stringent state regulation on groundwater use has caused a strain on the amount of freshwater availability. Apathy from bureaucratic powers and constant neglect has caused the problem to intensify. In hand with the lack of government interference and continued industrial waste deposited into major rivers, most freshwater entering the bodies of water is tainted.

Impact On Major Cities

Delhi has huge crisis of water and by 2020 Delhi might run out of groundwater. Different conservative estimates that Delhi water need is 1100 million gallons daily, whereas the supply is only 900 million gallons daily.  Delhi Crisis is primarily because of a) lack of stable water policies b) lack of coordination among different departments c) wastage of water through leakages.

On Verge of Acute Water Crisis, Bengaluru may turn uninhabitable in next few years, warn Experts

Population growth has put a strain on the city's natural resources and led to the depletion of lakes and wells in Bengaluru.

The revised master plan for the city, published by the Bengaluru Development Authority (BDA), has predicted that city’s population will increase by approximately 8 million and reach 20.3 million between 2019 and 2031. According to a study by Indian Institute of Science (IISc), the city will become inhabitable in the next few years if its population continues to grow at this alarming rate. This population growth has put a strain on the city's natural resources and led to the depletion of lakes and wells.

Ray Of Hope 

Some Indian states, however, are doing a better job than others in managing their water. Gujarat in the west topped the report's rankings. It was closely followed by Madhya Pradesh in central India and Andhra Pradesh in the south.

Fifteen of the 24 states scored better than they did the previous year, leading to one of the report's conclusions that "water management is improving across-the-board".

But what remains frightening is that the states that are ranked the lowest - such as Uttar Pradesh and Haryana in the north or Bihar and Jharkhand in the east - are also home to nearly half of India's population as well as the bulk of its agricultural produce.